Boxing

NFL And Former Penn State Football Players Training At LombardMMA

NBC Sports recently came to Titan Fitness & Martial Arts to watch and interview former Penn State football players, Mike Hull and Miles Deiffenbach, as they prepare for the opportunity to play in the NFL.

Mike and Miles have been training in Bruce Lombard's mixed martial arts/football cross training system(MMAFx) during their off-season as they wait for the NFL Draft and their future NFL team destination.

Bruce Lombard has been training collegiate and professional football players in his MMAFx training system since 2012.  Bruce is the owner of LombardMMA and trains his athletes and students out of Titan Fitness & Martial arts, located in State College, PA.

Check out NBC Sports piece with Ashley Chase...Click HERE:  Penn State pair using MMA to prepare for the NFL. 

 

Shadow Boxing – Guide For How To Shadow Box

Shadow boxing can be performed as a: training warm-up, technical development drill, sport application visual, and a overall training workout.

Shadow boxing is an effective drill for a novice boxer as well as a competitive boxer.  This is a drill can be used as a warm-up before training, conditioning training, technical training, or a sport application visual drill.

Beginners should consider standing in place, or static, as they begin their experience with starting level shadow boxing.  More developed and experienced boxers can utilize many other strategies and formats for their advanced shadow boxing.

Shadow boxing training can be structured in three pace levels for non beginning boxers...50%, 75%, 100%.  Beginner boxers should keep at a 50-75% pace.  Each intermediate to advanced level boxer can start at a warm up pace of 50% followed by increasing the pace in additional rounds of 75%.  Warm-ups and workout rounds should eventually accelerate to 100% of an individuals capable speed or pace.

View LombardMMA instructional video for "Shadow Boxing Drills"

Planning Your Meals And Snacks

One can consider feeding their body five to six times a day.  Eating every few hours supports your metabolism and provides necessary energy to get through  your workouts.

Try to consider eating at least 1,200 calories a day.  Any intake under this can limit your necessary energy levels to get the most out of your workouts.  Workout intensity will decrease which will lead to lower fitness levels and decreased weight loss.  Low calorie intake can make your body think it is starving and twist your metabolism in the opposite direction.

Snacks should be considered on average to be about 100 calories or less.  This can increase if necessary.  If to much of an increase is needed for energy, you should consider that snack a meal and adjust your meal plan for the day.

Stay hydrated!!  Consider drinking at least eight glasses or 64 ounces of water a day.  If sweating a lot or it is a hot environment, drink more if necessary.  Water is very valuable because it has zero calories, keeps you satiated, and helps flush out toxins from your body.  Try to avoid to much intake, if any, of juices, flavored waters, and other high calorie drinks within your day.

Consider this daily meal and snack plan:

BREAKFAST:  Within an hour of waking up.

SNACK:  Two to three hours of waking up.

LUNCH:  Two to three hours after snack

SNACK:  Two to three hours after lunch

DINNER:  Two to three hours after snack.  Eat at least two to three hours before going to bed.