MMA in State College

Shadow Boxing – Guide For How To Shadow Box

Shadow boxing can be performed as a: training warm-up, technical development drill, sport application visual, and a overall training workout.

Shadow boxing is an effective drill for a novice boxer as well as a competitive boxer.  This is a drill can be used as a warm-up before training, conditioning training, technical training, or a sport application visual drill.

Beginners should consider standing in place, or static, as they begin their experience with starting level shadow boxing.  More developed and experienced boxers can utilize many other strategies and formats for their advanced shadow boxing.

Shadow boxing training can be structured in three pace levels for non beginning boxers...50%, 75%, 100%.  Beginner boxers should keep at a 50-75% pace.  Each intermediate to advanced level boxer can start at a warm up pace of 50% followed by increasing the pace in additional rounds of 75%.  Warm-ups and workout rounds should eventually accelerate to 100% of an individuals capable speed or pace.

View LombardMMA instructional video for "Shadow Boxing Drills"

MMA/Football Cross Training System Getting National Recognition

Bruce Lombard's Defensive Lineman hand speed and technique training program has been getting national recognition with the success of MMAFx football athlete, Anthony Zettel.

MMAFx(Mixed Martial Art/Football Cross Training) was developed by LombardMMA owner, Bruce Lombard, in 2011.  The system has three specific programs that help high level collegiate and professional football players "Gain An Edge" on the field.

Recently the Philadelphia Daily News and ESPN.com did articles on the football cross training system and how it has benefited collegiate football stand out, Anthony Zettel.

Learn more about the MMAFx system and the football athletes that participate in this comprehensive and progressive training system.  Follow this link: MMAFx

 

Submission Grappling Attack Approach – Neck, Arm, Leg!!

The most successful submission grapplers have a full body attack approach.  The ability to have awareness and skill to attack an opponents neck, arm, and leg provides best results for a grappler.

When a submission grappling athlete has to defend the three main attack areas on their body as opposed to just one or two areas, their defense becomes more complicated.  For example, when a grappling athlete or student does not have to worry about defending legs locks by their opponent, it allows their defense game to only have to be aware of their neck and arm.

Submission grapplers should develop a compound attack approach, meaning...if a grappler is attacking their opponent's neck and it fails, they should be able to transition to an arm lock or leg lock for a submission attempt.

For best success on the grappling mat, develop a game that can be competent at attacking the opponent's full body!

Learn your chokes, neck cranks, arm locks, and leg locks!!!!  Then drill and live roll with your training partners.